Cornell Veterinary School Expansion Construction Update, 11/2017

19 11 2017

The new 12,000 SF Community Practice Service building is fully framed, sheathed in plywood, and appears to be coated in a dark blue water resistive barrier (WRB). Most of the structure is wood frame, with some lightweight structural steel used to frame the canopies over the front and rear entries. Windows have yet to be fitted in the rough openings, and the plastic sheet covers might be for worker protection from the elements as G. M. Crisalli and its subcontractors work on interior rough-ins. HVAC roof equipment is in place, but the sheets on the roof suggest the final material has yet to be applied (perhaps EPDM synthetic rubber or a similar membrane). The front parking lot is already paved and striped, and as shown back in September, the concrete sidewalk has been poured and is nearly complete. Variations in facade materials (flat and corrugated aluminum, wood panels/wood-like fiber cement panels) will help to break up the structure’s bulk as it heads towards completion. The new CPS Building, designed by Ithaca’s HOLT Architects, should be open by May 2018.





Cayuga Medical Associates Construction Update, 11/2017

8 11 2017

According the the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, medical and educational services are the largest component of Ithaca’s economy, and among its fastest growing. While the colleges are growing incrementally, medical services have boomed as people live longer (up 5.2 years in Tompkins County from 1980-2014), and Baby Boomers’ need for medical services grows – Cayuga Medical Center has added several hundred jobs in the past decade alone.

In March 2016, Cayuga Medical Associates, a for-profit business partnered with Cayuga Medical Center, announced plans to build an outpatient facility at Community Corners, an early-suburban style shopping and office center located at the five corners intersection of Cayuga Heights (the official project address is 903-909 Hanshaw Road). While the core of the plaza dates from the late 1940s, additions such as the Chemung Canal branch and the renovated Island Fitness gym branch have been built in the past several years. CMA had been looking for sites in northeast Tompkins County, and found that Community Corners was the best choice for their needs.

Initial plans called for a 3-story, 39,500 SF building designed by local architecture firm HOLT Architects, which has a well-known specialty in highly technical medical structures. the first floor would host cardiology and cardiac care services (later revised to neurological services), and internal care (prevention, diagnosis and treatment of adult diseases) on the second floor. The third floor was still rather speculative when first proposed. The building was expected to host about 72 staff and 400 patients per day. The project was going to be a bit of a slog – Cayuga Heights has what’s likely the most stringent planning board of any municipality in Tompkins, and the project would need variances for height, setbacks and lot coverage. Landscape architecture firm TWMLA’s Kim Michaels would represent owner Tim Ciaschi and the project team at meetings.

After a few months of back and forth, it became clear the the village was not going to be comfortable with the 3-story plan, and having no tenants locked down for the top floor, the scale of the project was decreased to 2 floors and 28,200 SF (23,200 SF lease-able space) in July 2016. Now only expecting 300 patients per day, the variances needed were generally more minor – while the height was contentious, a few percent over the maximum lot coverage isn’t as much of a concern. The village has eyed a denser, mixed-use Community Corners, if not necessarily the traffic and people that go with it; neighboring property owner Mark Mecenas has been mulling over plans for several years. The more modern-looking original design was replaced by one that better fit the plaza’s 1940s building, with gables and dormers.

Although concerns were raised over traffic, aesthetics, and those who felt Community Corners was the wrong place for a medical facility (they wanted street-level shops with condos above), the board was reasonably pleased with the changes, and after a few more months of SEQR review, the project was approved in November 2016. However, it was approved on the stipulation that parking demand mitigation measures be prepared and approved by the village first, as well as a customary submission of planned exterior finishes. Since parking had been underused at the rear of the site, only fifteen parking spaces are being added, for a total of 300, which brings it close to capacity (estimated daily use upon full occupancy was 262 spaces for the 3-story version). The submitted and approved parking plan allows for a small amount of overflow into neighboring lots, a partnership with the Gadabout bus service for seniors, talks with TCAT and a shower station for those who wish to bike to work. The parking plan was approved by the village back in August.

Along with the building, the project provides revised internal circulation with new driveways and sidewalks, landscaping, and stormwater facilities.  A one-story 1950s office building and a 1960s former Tompkins Trust bank branch were demolished to make room for the new building. The exterior will be faced with off-white brick and a grey brick header course, with a metal roof and aluminum windows. Current plans call for the building to open during summer 2018.

According to county filings, Chemung Canal Trust Company is providing the $7.8 million construction loan. McPherson Builders of Ithaca is the general contractor, which is offhand the largest project I can recall for which a local firm has served as GC. Along with HOLT Architects designing the building and TWMLA doing the landscaping, Ithaca’s T.G. Miller P.C. provided civil engineering and surveying work.

As of the end of October, demolition of existing structures has been mostly completed, with only the slab foundations remaining. The new building will also use a slab foundation, four feet thick according to the elevation drawing below.

Pre-development, April 16th 2017:

October 24th, 2017

 

August 2016 revision. The version approved in 2016 used fiber cement boards, later revised to brick.

 





Tompkins Financial Corporation HQ Construction Update, 10/2017

27 10 2017

Work continues on the new Tompkins Trust office tower in downtown Ithaca. The official topping-out, which means that the building has reached maximum structural height and framing is complete, was earlier this month. U.S. Gypsum sheathing can be seen on the east and south (front) sides, with fireproofing and interior stud walls clearly visible from street level. You can see some of the HVAC rough-ins on the lower floors. Meanwhile, on the north (rear) and west faces, the exterior facade has been bricked and paneled with aluminum metal, tan brick, dark grey brick, stone sills and aluminum window fittings. It’s a little surprising the sunshades are already up, since exterior details typically don’t come until later in the construction process – and it’s clearly not that far along, given the rough openings still present at ground level. The base will be finished with brick and granite.

To be honest, I was concerned the back side would end up looking cheap, but it seems to be coming up nicely, but I’m holding off on final judgement until I see how the rear stairwell turns out.

About the biggest change at this point is that the $31.3 million, 110,000 SF building may not be finished and completed occupied until mid-May 2018, two months later than initially planned.





Tompkins Financial Corporation HQ Construction Update, 8/2017

25 08 2017

At the new Tompkins Financial Headquarters under construction at 119 West Seneca Street downtown, it looks like most of the structural steel has been erected, and gypsum sheathing has been installed over the skeleton. The top (seventh) floor is set back slightly from the lower levels, and will use light colored aluminum metal panels on all sides except the front, which will use black brick and stone veneer. With the exception of the rear stairwell, the side and rear walls will be faced with a tan brick veneer on the lower floors.

Brick veneer can be tricky because it’s porous. Water can penetrate the brick and make its way to subsurface coatings, where moisture can do damage over time. As a result, builders have to use a water-resistive barrier (WRB) between the sheathing and the brick. This can be done a few different ways – with Simeon’s and DiBella’s, for example, they used a polyurethane spray foam.

In this case, it looks like there’s a bright blue-colored vapor barrier being applied over the sheathing, probably Carisle Coating and Waterproofing (CCW) 705 or similar. CCW-705 is a rubberized-asphalt adhesive laminated with a smooth, durable plastic film. Construction crews spray an adhesive (CAV-GRIP) onto the sheathing, and then roll out the air/water barrier sheets over the top, kinda like wallpaper. These unfurled sheets are then pressed over with a seam roller to ensure it’s firmly and completely applied to the building surface.  The edges of the sheets are then filled in with a liquid mastic, which is a putty-like waterproof filler and sealant. Once the surface is completely sealed by the barrier, tie plates are fastened with washers and screws, and the brick veneer is laid over the top, typically with a 2″ spacing for drainage and ventilation. It appears the brick may be underway on the western wall of the building, as shown in the first image below. Meanwhile, the bottom floor looks like a different sheathing material, some variety of Dow Thermax panels (fiberglass embedded in polyiso) from the looks of it.

Based on building elevations and girder brackets, the JPW Erectors crane located at the southeast corner of the site will eventually be replaced with the last steel sections for the building. The steel decking is in, and there’s ductwork for the HVAC rough-ins. Curious to see if they’ll have the building closed up before the first snow flies.

LeChase is the general contractor, and it looks like they have some union crews doing work on site – the Carpenters’ Union Local 277 and the IBEW (International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers) Local 241 have signage up, as do project team members JPW Erectors, Elwyn & Palmer (structural engineering), TWMLA Landscape Architects, and HOLT Architects.

 





602 West State Street Construction Update, 7/2017

19 07 2017

The new Elmira Savings Bank is open in Ithaca’s West End, and this project is done. A former restaurant is now 5,000 SF of renovated space plus 1,600 SF in a contemporary addition. Design-wise, it’s a smart re-use of a century-old structure, modernizing it but maintaining the integrity the original structure. Kudos to HOLT Architects for a successful blend of old and new. Elmira’s Edger Enterprises brought the $1.7 million project from the drawing board and into reality.

There’s no doubt that the project is further proof in the increased vitality and attraction of Ithaca’s long-forsaken West End, and another step on the the path to turning it into a stronger neighborhood. Within just a block, one has the new Planned Parenthood (2014), the 17-unit Iacovelli Apartments (2013), the renovated HOLT Architects office (2016), a gas station renovated into the Jade Garden restaurant (2015), and the new microbrewery opening up in the rear of the Cornell Laundry warehouse.

If there is one thing I wish had gone different with this project, it was the sale of the property and removal of three low-income families. That got ugly, and it tarnished what was otherwise a decent project. The story I’ve been told in the two years since is that the bank were mislead by the previous owner, who gave them old rental paperwork saying tenants were month-to-month, and ESB mistakenly assumed it was still accurate. So there’s something to be said about due diligence and taking a couple hours out to meet with tenants before any notices go out.

The northern end of the property has preserved a few mature trees, and in the long-run ESB would like to partner with a developer, affordable or otherwise, to do something along West Seneca. Plus, there are organizations like Lakeview, who coincidentally looked at doing a development where ESB is nowand are moving forward with affordable housing in the West End. More opportunities for mixed-use plans with market-rate and affordable housing will open up as properties go on the market and Ithaca’s economy continues to develop – and plans like Cayuga Med’s are big if auspicious question marks.

While it’s great to have new housing plans brought forward, it’s also important to maintain existing affordable housing (and programs to assist) while adding those new options. With Lakeside and Parkside scooped up and pushed upmarket, and Maple Hill now market-rate Ithaca East, that takes hundreds of units out of the equation, and this is a significant concern. It’s no surprise that tensions boiled over given the difficulties in preserving existing LMI housing options, and in approving and building new ones.

Anyway, enough with the final thoughts. Enjoy the photos.

Before:

After:





602 West State Street Construction Update, 5/2017

30 05 2017

Starting to get a good idea of what the final product will look like at the future Elmira Savings Bank location at 602 West State Street. The structural steel for the drive-thru canopy is up, the new front and rear entrance canopies are being erected, and the new curbing is down. The new north addition has its steel and masonry with matching belt course, but it looks like the new interior stairs have yet to be built (the floor plan of the new addition is basically a stairwell albeit an imposing one, an elevator lobby and the elevator). the two-story opening facing Meadow Street will be framed with metal panels and fitted out with a contemporary glass curtain wall.

The early renders suggested a beige color for the aluminum panels, but according to the final materials submission, the panels will be Alucobond “Anodic Satin Mica”, which most folks would describe as a soft tan/dull tan. The alumnium roof coping, flashing and gutters/downspouts will be Hickman Sandstone, and the stucco will be painted Benjamin Moore Horizon Greyboth are close approximations of the building’s historic paint colors.

Taking a guess, the arched windows have to be custom-made, and given the time that takes, it might explain why they’re the last replacement windows to be inserted. The windows will be fitted with metal sunshades towards the end of the construction period.

Construction on the $1.7 million renovation/addition (5,000SF/1,600 SF, total 6,600 SF) is due to wrap up in August. Elmira Savings Bank will occupy 3,300 SF on the first floor. The second floor, also about 3300 SF, will host for-rent office space (a little too big for the Voice though, which I’d wager at 800 SF off the cuff). HOLT Architects is in charge of design, and Elmira’s Edger Enterprises is in charge of the buildout. It looks like glazing has been subcontracted to Frontier Glass Inc. of Rochester.





Cornell Veterinary School Expansion Construction Update, 3/2017

26 03 2017

There’s been quite a bit of progress over at the Vet School. It looks like the exterior glass and aluminum are going on the new library and administrative wing. Windows and sheathing have been installed on the north face as well, with a water-resistive barrier applied over the sheathing. The new atrium is being framed out.

According to the Vet School’s construction update page, interior framing and utilities installations are underway in the new wing, and the new cafeteria is under construction – both are aiming for August completions. The new atrium and lecture hall will be closed off shortly, with interior work to launch in earnest once that occurs.

Thanks to Maria Livingston over at HOLT Architects, readers now know what the new Community Practice Service building will look like. Syracuse’s G. M. Crisalli and Associates Inc. has been selected as general contractor, and construction for the $7 million, 12,000 SF wood-frame structure is expected from March 2017- March 2018.