Lansing Meadows Construction Update, 3/2020

22 03 2020

This mostly reuses the Voice gallery writeup, but it’s a chance to publish all the unused photos as well.

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There’s been a little bit of controversy lately with developer Eric Goetzmann’s senior housing project on Oakcrest Drive in the village of Lansing. Goetzmann has approached the village and the Tompkins County Industrial Development Agency for permission to convert the rental project to for-sale senior housing. Physically, the changes would be very limited, as it’s mostly the creation of interior lot lines. In terms of concept, though, it’s a more substantial change. The IDA went into private Executive Session to discuss the matter because it involved Goetzmann’s finances and topics of potential future legal action, and the result was that they objected to making them for-sale. The village is willing to consider lot subdivision if Goetzmann and the IDA can work out their differences. Not to delve into speculation behind the Executive Session, but as proposed, it sounds like a 55+ person could buy the unit and let their college kids occupy it, and hope a future Homeowner’s Association handles it. That doesn’t sound like the senior housing the county had in mind.

As approved, the residential components consist of two phases. Four one-story triplexes (12 units total) will be ready for occupancy by the end of July 2020. Two more triplexes (6 units) will be built in a second phase to be ready for occupancy in December 2020. One of the triplexes has been roofed and fitted with windows, a second is fully framed, the third was being framed out, and the fourth was just a concrete pad with sub-slab utility hook-ups poking out. Project planning, design, and construction services are being provided by an all-in-one firm, McFarland Johnson of Binghamton.

A history of the project and an overall description can be found here.





Library Place Construction Update, 1/2020

17 01 2020

Library Place is making progress over at 105 West Court Street (the new mailing address; guess we should stop saying 314 North Cayuga Street now). The concrete masonry unit (CMU) northeast elevator/stair tower has topped off, and it looks like part of the northwest tower is being assembled now. The square holes above the lower levels of the tower are most likely slots for structural steel. If I’m reading the floor plans right, a third stair tower will be constructed along the south wall of the building. The concrete foundation footers have been poured, and a CMU foundation wall is being assembled; the pink materials along the outside of the wall are lightweight polystyrene insulation boards, Owens Corning Foamular from the looks of it. I see a work truck on site for subcontractor Gorick Construction of Binghamton, but rather surprisingly there’s no signage around for general contractor LeChase Construction.

Signs along the perimeter fence advertise a Spring 2021 opening for the four-story, 86,700 SF building. Prices for the 66 senior housing units are not yet available. Amenities will include a restaurant, à la carte home health services from an on-site agency, community room, courtyard gardens, workout facilities, warming pool, and underground parking. Senior services non-profit Lifelong will provide on-site activities and programs.

More information about the history of the project and its stats can be found here. The project website is here.





Lansing Meadows Construction Update, 12/2019

21 12 2019

In the interest of brevity, I’m going to hold off on writing most of the backstory – as Dan Veaner at the Lansing Star noted, the project had at least nine major changes over nine years, and was a discussion topic at no less than 58 meetings. Several articles can also be found on the Voice here.

Lansing Meadows is a $14 million mixed-use project consisting of the BJ’s Wholesale Club that opened in 2012, wetland creation (done outside the area in the Cayuga County town of Montezuma), and a residential component on Oakcrest Road that was a stipulation of the village of Lansing as part of the creation of the Planned Development Area. The senior housing on Oakcrest is being built on wetlands created by an overflowing culvert in the 1970s, when the mall was built. The rest of the site was a vacant, unofficial dumping ground for materials. Whether they’re new or old, by law wetlands removed by development have to be replaced.

The project also has a payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) with the Tompkins County IDA, which was controversial when granted (PILOTS and abatements for retail projects are generally discouraged), and as the years went on and the sentiment was that the developer, Eric Goetzmann of Triax Management Group d/b/a Arrowhead Ventures LLC, was dragging his feet on the residential and the county had started to take legal steps to “claw back” the $2.32 million in benefits before Goetzmann finally put something forth. Even then, the residential portion had to go through a few iterations in order to come to a mutually-acceptable plan with the village. The final set of plans were approved in June 2019.

As approved, the residential components consists of two phases. Four one-story triplexes (12 units total) will be ready for occupancy by the end of July 2020. Two more triplexes (6 units) will be built in a second phase to be ready for occupancy in December 2020. All units are senior rental housing, set aside for those aged 55+.

The two end units in each building will be 1252 square feet with a 395 square foot garage. The center unit will be 1114 square feet with a 251 square foot garage. Although not explicitly stated, the square footage appears to be in the ballpark for new two-bedroom or two-bedroom plus den apartments. The units all face a one-way private loop road, called “Lansing Meadows Drive”. Being a one-way allows it to be narrower, yet still meet the village’s specifications and allowing on-street parking. Project planning/design/construction services are being provided by an all-in-one firm, McFarland Johnson of Binghamton.

Framing and sheathing has been completed for one of the 1.5 story triplexes, with framing underway on a second and foundation work ongoing with the next two. The framing is standard wood frame on a concrete slab foundation with underground utility hook-ups, and the sheathing is the ever-popular Huber ZIP plywood panels. Windows and doors have been fitted into the most complete unit, and the roof has been shingled. Rather interestingly, it looks like vinyl trim boards are already in place on the eaves of the structure, something that usually doesn’t come along until much later in the construction process. On the inside, it appears that mechanical, electrical and plumbing rough-ins are ongoing.

The space on the easternmost end of the parcel is intended to be developed at a later date for a small-scale (~2,000 SF) commercial retail component, possibly a small restaurant or coffee shop.

 

 

 

 





Library Place Construction Update, 10/2019

10 11 2019

Quoting the roundup at the Voice:

“With the foundation piles in place, wood forms have been erected for the pouring of the concrete footers and exterior foundation walls for the four-story building. Part of the old library’s foundation is being reused in the project, but the two buildings have somewhat different footprints, so some new foundation walls are necessary. The rebar extended from the steel piles is encased in concrete and capped, and the steel bolts rising out of the cap will tie into the structural skeleton of the building above. Underground water pipes are being connected from the building to the city’s water system this week.

You might notice some similarities with the Cornell project with the forming and pouring walls, but also note some big differences as well – some of the building sites in Cornell (the sophomore village buildings) don’t require deep foundations. The soil on the hills is in better shape than it is in the more low-lying areas, and can generally handle a heavier load. This gives Cornell the benefit of being able to do quicker, less expensive foundation work in those areas where a shallow foundation is feasible.

The $17 million mixed-use building, which will contain commercial space, space administered by Lifelong and 66 senior apartments, is anticipating opening at the tail end of 2020 or early 2021.”

One thing that’s not readily apparent quite yet is that there’s a partially underground parking garage below the primary structure. That garage does not extend all the way to the street except for the entrance, which is where the fence gates are (and where these photos start from). You can eyeball the perimeter walls from the three concrete wells partitioned off in various boxes – the northern one, seen in the fourth photo, will house an elevator, mechanical room and stairwell, the middle one next to the excavator will house the trash room, and the southern one, next to the huge stack of masonry blocks, will house a maintenance room and southern stairwell.





105 Dearborn Place Construction Update, 8/2019

7 08 2019

The 12-bedroom, 16-person luxury senior home under construction at 105 Dearborn Place is substantially complete. The stone veneer is being attached to the base, and Schickel Construction is building up the porte cochere, with decks and patios soon to follow. Landscaping and paving will come at the end of construction. Also, note the heat pump on the exterior in the lower right of the third photo. The exterior finishes appear to be durable, detailed and of high quality, befitting for a high-end independent living facility. According to developer, Bridges Cornell owner Elizabeth Classen Ambrose, the new building will have a “grand opening” event later this year. Some lavish renders from the project website follow at the end of the post (I have no idea what the small structure is next to the house – a playhouse for visiting children?). Quick aside, while this blog refers to the project by its street address, Bridges staff prefer it be called “The Craftsman”.

An interesting side note, Classen Ambrose picked up the relative new (2005) single-family home at 116 Dearborn Place for $900,000 on June 6th. However, no redevelopment is planned. Apparently, some fraternities had been looking at the property, and to prevent some raucous neighbors from moving next door, she bought the property and intends to rent it out as she sees fit. It’s not uncommon to hear in the Voice comments, “if you don’t want [xyz] happening next door, buy it,” and in Classen Ambrose’s case, she did. Classen Ambrose has also joined the City Harbor development team as a project investor, and by the time this piece runs, there will be a related piece of news on the Voice’s website.

More background info about the project can be found here and here.

 





Library Place (Old Library Redevelopment) Construction Update, 8/2019

7 08 2019

With tax abatement approvals in hand, construction on the 67-unit Library Place project is set to move forward. According to the project website, at the moment 20 steel test piles are being driven into the ground to verify the correct depth to the subsurface layer that will support the weight of the structure (the library’s foundation is being reused, but the new 4-story building is heavier and has additional load bearing needs). If all goes well, the remaining 60 piles will be delivered and driven into the ground, with pile driving work to wrap up around Labor Day. This is somewhat later in the year than first anticipated.

It looks like the pile driver in the photos below came from Ferraro Pile and Shoring Inc. of Buffalo. Some grading and surveying equipment is also scattered about the site. LeChase Construction is the general contractor for the project, and Travis Hyde Properties is the developer for the senior housing project.

Quick aside – I can generally tell how familiar readers are with Ithaca when they email asking questions about “Mr. Travis Hyde”. Quick refresher, Travis Hyde is led by company president Frost Travis of the locally prominent Travis family of developers, and his brother-in-law, company vice-president Chris Hyde.

The 50 year-old time capsule from the Old Library was recovered and opened in a public ceremony; coverage of that and the contents can be found courtesy of my Voice colleagues here. The full history of the project and a description of the plans can be found here.





105 Dearborn Place Construction Update, 5/2019

24 05 2019

We’ll change up the format a bit for this post. Below is a recent email from Ithaca resident Joan Jacobs Brumberg:

I had an opportunity to talk yesterday with Elizabeth Classen Ambrose who is the organizational power behind a growing Bridges community. I wanted to find out more about Library Place interiors but we ended up spending a fascinating hour talking about The Craftsman, a new kind of Ithaca residence for the elderly resembling the group homes in Holland and Denmark.

Four things about this project — to be completed in November 2019– strike me as important for the public to know:
1. This is a new form of independent living for 16 older folks who do not want home or apartment to care for. Each individual room is lovely with private bath and fireplace, small refrigerator. I believe you bring your own furnishings, ie.,  the things you care about most.
2. No upfront payment and no lease.
3. Residents have access to special Car Share vehicles and also Bridges shuttle service if they do not drive.
4. Many amenities for the elderly: warming pool, gym, a trainer, maybe podiatrist and physical therapy. And a special add on: garden space.

I told some people my age about this facility and everyone asked “How did you learn about it?” Even if they are candidates for Library Place, my friends have older parents, relatives, and friends who are burdened with private homes or apartments that are increasingly hard to care for.

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It came as part of an article pitch for the Voice, but since I did an article about Bridges for the Voice two years ago, I declined. The website for the new house is online, with plenty of rather sumptuous interior renders (a few embeds are below many more are on the website). The twelve bedrooms (eight single-occupancy, four double-occupancy for couples) will feature heated floors, fireplaces in some units, large-screen televisions, optional dry bar with refrigerator and hot beverage maker, and private deck or patio areas. Other planned features include an on-site fitness center, storage room, car share, spa and salon services, on-site concierge, and lush landscaping befitting a high-end independent living facility. Residents are expected to be able to go about their daily activities with little to no assistance, but cooking, cleaning and laundry are taken care of by staff. Pending “interviews” by staff for compatibility, residents may even be allowed to have their pets join them.

Schickel Construction has the house largely finished from the outside. Painting of the cedar shingles continues, and architectural detailing/trim (balconies, porch columns) is ongoing. The stone veneer has yet to be attached to the built-out cinder block basement level, but all of the windows and most of the doors have been fitted. No photos of the back side, because there was a kitchen staffer on break who was clearly uncomfortable with this shutterbug.

More background info about the project can be found here.