News Tidbits 5/9: Changing Elevations

9 05 2015

cinema_drive_1

1. Looks like the CU Suites project is in fact the render shared by Taylor Contractors. Readers might remember these elevations from last week for a proposed “Cinema Drive Senior Housing”, but that the image didn’t match up with the proposal, a 3-story, 43,000 sq ft structure. According to the village of Lansing’s Board of Zoning Appeals agenda, the project is now a multi-story mixed-use building with a size of 87,515 square feet, which looks about right for the building proposed above. The project is seeking rear yard setback and height variances for not enough of a rear yard parking setback from the lot line, and for exceeding the maximum height allowed by zoning (which is 35 feet).

Doing some back of the envelope calculations, if one calls only the top three floors senior housing ((3/4.5) * 87515 = 58343) and uses the rough guidelines of 15% for circulation/utilities and 980 sq ft per unit, then one gets about 51 units, which makes this a pretty sizable project by local standards.

inhs_pride_v3_elevations_1 inhs_pride_v3_elevations_2

2. Now for a change or perspective – new perspectives of the 210 Hancock project, in the form of elevations found in higher resolution here. Now you can see what all of the buildings look like as a whole, rather than the simulated viewpoints previously shown. The elevations heights give the apartment building’s height at about 40 feet. Apart from some tweaks to the way the first-floor parking is screened, there haven’t been a whole lot of changes since the last planning board meeting. Note that the buildings are tucked in or pushed out and separated by “hyphen” connectors so they don’t present one continuous street wall. The design is by local firms TWLA and HOLT Architects.

Am I the only one who finds the lime green and goldenrod to be a bit..intense when compared to the other facade materials?

112_blair_v3_1 112_blair_v3_2

3. You want more new drawings? You get more new drawings! This batch represents the latest incarnation of the duplexes proposed for 112 Blair Street / 804 East State Street. Renders copied from here, project narrative here. Developer Demos / Johnny LLC (the Nestopoulos family) is still trying to have these ready in time for the Fall 2015 school year. Rather than continue seeking an area variance in zoning, the project is back down to two duplexes with three bedrooms and ~1,235 sq ft each (12 bedrooms total). After meeting with neighbors, it was decided to move back to surface building to reduce building height, and to add expansive front porches, which gives the otherwise bland duplexes a little character. Site Plan Review will take place this month.

clarebridgecrossings_1

4. Looks like there might be an expansion of senior care facilities in Ithaca town. The Ithaca Town Board is set to discuss changes next week to the Planned Development Zone (PDZ) for the Sterling Heights / Clare Bridge Cottage assisted living facilities, located on Bundy Road just north of the city-town line. Sterling House is a 48-unit assisted living facility, while Claire Bridge Cottage is a 32-unit facility specializing in memory care (Alzheimer’s and dementia). The new building, a 23,200 sq ft 32-unit facility to be called “Clare Bridge Crossings”, is designed to bridge the gap between the two – patients who might be in early stages of illness and experiencing mild symptoms, but otherwise still capable of some degree of personal independence.

The new building appears to be a one-story addition tucked between the other two structures, so it won’t be visible from the street. Along with the new building, there will be updates to parking, landscaping stormwater facilities, and the addition of a couple of courtyards between the buildings. The architect is PDC Midwest, a Wisconsin firm that specializes in memory care facilities.

Now, some readers might be saying, “who cares?”. There’s a couple of reasons to care. For one, this is important from a quality-of-life perspective. Picture a senior couple where one is reasonably healthy and the other has memory care needs. It means a lot to have a facility nearby that can care for their loved ones. Secondly, an expansion would bring with it a number of jobs to support the new residents – nurses, maintenance, kitchen staff and so forth. So there’s an economic benefit as well.

Full disclosure – my mother is a nurse who works for an assisted living program that includes clients with memory care concerns. So I’ve heard a thing or two about a thing or two.

east_hill_master_plan

5. On a parting note for the week, here’s a little more information on Cornell’s redevelopment plans for East Hill Plaza. According to Planning Committee minutes from the town of Ithaca, Cornell will be taking part in a multi-day design charrette hosted by form-based zoning proponents FormIthaca in early June. Form-based zoning in a very small nutshell is zoning that focuses on design elements rather than use. Cornell is interested because the plan will hopefully lead to a regulating plan for the “compact mixed-use” development Cornell hopes to build to build in that area. The plan could provide language for a new Planned Development Zone that would potentially allow Cornell to move forward with a housing/retail mix at East Hill Plaza.

Cornell has sought to redevelop East Hill Plaza and surrounding parcels (most of which they already own) for several years. A vision for the plaza shows up in Cornell’s 2008 Master Plan (the so-called “East Hill Village” shown above), and given the need for housing in the area, East Hill Plaza would likely be one of the location where opposition would be less likely, given the the lack of homeowners nearby and the site’s proximity to Cornell.

 


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7 responses

9 05 2015
Ex-Ithacan

As I said before, more Senior Housing is a good thing. I agree with you on the 210 Hancock renderings, the colors are very distracting.

Concerning the East Hill Village project, do you know if the project would be tax exempt? I would think not, but one never knows. It could be quite an exciting (though very suburban) development. I wonder how extensive road improvements would need to be, and who would cover that cost.

10 05 2015
B. C.

Cornell pays taxes on East Hill Plaza, so I imagine that a retail/residential mixed-use development with non-institutional tenants would pay taxes as well.

9 05 2015
Cornell PhD

Kinda wish that Cinema Drive housing were in Ithaca city somewhere where it looks like it’d belong.

Too bad those plain jane houses along State St. won’t seem to be getting any facade upgrades from the angle most people see them – the street itself.

As for the East Hill redevelopment – huge. And it doesn’t look any more suburban than most of Ithaca is already, really. Except for the couple surface lots that still seem to be facing major roads where the intent was clearly to create a streetwall – what’s up with that?

10 05 2015
B. C.

I wouldn’t worry about the details much, since East Hill Village was just a concept at the time. A lot can happen in seven years, and I’m cautiously optimistic about what Cornell has planned.

15 05 2015
CS PhD

I really hope Cornell goes through with (some variation of) this plan for East Hill Plaza. It would be so much better than the desolate suburban parking lot, er, strip mall, that currently sprawls across the area. If they build apartments there I’m sure they could rent them to students, because it’s not actually that far from Cornell, it just feels distant and disconnected now because it’s so unwalkable.

16 05 2015
News Tidbits 5/16: Smart Developments, or Sprawl? | Ithacating in Cornell Heights

[…] existing bleaches, dugouts and press box. The 32-unit Clare Bridge assisted senior living project that was discussed last week will be reviewed. There are also sketch plans to be presented for a propane refueling station and […]

11 07 2015
News Tidbits 7/11/15: Trying to Make A Dent in the Housing Deficit | Ithacating in Cornell Heights

[…] at 112 Blair / 804 East State Street in outer Collegetown. Updated file here, previous plans here. It kinda feels like there’s a disconnect going on – the neighbors basically […]

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